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Selected responses to John T. Reed’s analysis of Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

Posted by John Reed on

Selected responses to John T. Reed’s analysis of Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki

Hey Mr. Reed,

I just wanted to thank you for your amazing work on your website on debunking the lies of Robert Kiyosaki. Like, you literally don't know how much your article has helped me. I'm a 20 year old college student, and after reading RDPD, I lost all my ambition for school. I had a high GPA, was in honors, and honor society, but I decided to not show up for my finals, flunked out of a quarter, and began my quest to become a self-made millionaire using what I learned (which was nothing) from Mr. KIYOBULLSHIT.

I don't think RK knows how much damage he is causing. "How to be Rich and Happy: Don't go to School?" And I was such an idiot for believing and idolizing him. I read like all of his books except five of them. And despite the fact, that he basically just repeated himself every freaking book, I DIDN'T SEE THE RED FLAGS. He constantly antagonizes poor dad, and he goes on about the rich life with the fancy cars and overpriced ROLEX watches. It doesn't matter! Who cares about all that expensive, worthless crap!! I almost flipped over a table when I learned that Rich Dad was a fictional character. They were all lies, and it was just about the money!!

Sigh, you saved me from a dark and stupid path. I was going to leave college for good, create businesses and go into real estate without any prior knowledge. I've spent so many hours listening to Kiyosaki's lectures and his other accomplices to get rich. I'm so done! RK keeps talking about how the economy is going to collapse this year and that everyone should buy silver and gold. I do trust silver and gold, but what's the catch? I suspect that there's always a catch with these "THE SKY IS FALLING" gurus. I'm sorry for the informal post. Its 1:30 am, here in Cupertino, California, I've been reading your article nonstop. Anyways, what do you think about silver? Is it a good investment?

I'll be reading much more of your stuff soon, Mr. Reed. You have saved me countless of dollars that I was going to spend on Rich Dad seminars, and I definitely owe you one. I'm going back to school to get my degree, and I won't take my education for granted anymore.

Thanks,

P.S. I don't mind you posting this in your website, but please withhold my name, and feel free to edit any excessive parts. Thanks!

Dear Mr. Reed,

Thank you for taking the time to expose Kiyosaki's work. You're research is, indeed, extensive; you have an overwhelming amount of evidence that reveals so many lies, deceptions, inconsistencies, and poor advice in all of his work. My life was personally effected by Rich Dad, Poor Dad for the worst.

I read Kiyosaki's book in 2002, just after graduating high school, as a highly ambitious 18 year old with absolutely zero experience in the real world of working, much less owning a business. My father was a painter growing up, and out of high school I had the bright idea of starting a painting company…. I didn't know how, but I was certain starting a business would make me a millionaire by the time I was 25. Reading Rich Dad, Poor Dad convinced me to drop out of my local jr. college after my first semester to pursue business. I loathed school after that; I often scoffed at people striving to get an education only to end up working some low to middle management job their who lives when I could drop out and become a millionaire just like Kiyosaki's phantom rich dad.

I am now 29 years old, with a good amount of business and tax debt I accumulated throughout the years due to my incompetency (a term Kiyosaki uses to be a positive business trait...). I didn't know the first thing about balancing a check book, much less the ability to implement basic accounting and tax filing skills. I imagine that Kiyosaki's readers are mostly the young, impressionable, and highly ambitious types you find wrapped up in multi-level-marketing. The very demographic that should not try to start a business without some foundation in financial responsibility.

Kiyosaki's work is dangerous. I am happy to say that I graduate from UCLA this June. I went back to school after a very difficult recession taught me the value of having an education. Though my company still exists (www.zamorapaintingcompany.com), it has been an incredibly difficult journey that requires a lot of attention…. Getting an education has made me eons more confident, responsible, and prepared to be a successful business owner. I feel like I have a personal responsibility to make young people aware of the dangerous advice that Mr. Kiyosaki gives.

Thank you for your work. Your review is scathing, but extremely beneficial. I only wish I had found it earlier. Additionally, you may use my story in any way that might help your continued interest in making people aware of Kiyosaki's dangerous program.

Kindest regards,

Chris Zamora

Thanks for sharing John Reed's website with me:
I don't know much about finances, investing, and real estate. That's why I took the real estate class with Smallwood. That's why I read books and articles on those subjects. I do know that Robert Kiyosaki presents some great insights about how to make your money work for you so you won't have to work hard all your life. He was able to retire at age 45. I do know that Donald Trump knows real estate and he has teamed up with Robert Kiyosaki to teach others what they know and how they became successful. I wish I had read his book Rich Dad, Poor Dad years ago. I wish that, like him, I had a mentor at a young age, to teach me what he was taught. I agree with the following e-mails that were sent to this Reed guy. This guy is condemning and critizing someone's book while trying to sell his own. If his book is so much better why would he have to take the low road to promote it? Why isn't it a best seller? After viewing his website I would never buy one of his books.
"Hello,
After reading your article on Kiyosaki http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html <http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html> I am purely amazed at your ignorance. You said you read Rich Dad Poor Dad, but after hearing what you said there is no way that you read it, either that or you completely misunderstood it. You misinterpreted ALL of his messages. His books are more about the mindset you should have about finances, not directions on what to do. You said that he is not a businessman, just an author...well considering his company (which is far more than a book company) is growing at an unbelievable rate I would say he is doing something right in the world of business. Misinterpreting things is human, everyone does it, but to go off and rant about it on your website...get real. You made a fool of yourself and any credibility you might have had with people you’ve ruined. Quit trying to bash others to make yourself seem better because you are jealous you will never get to the level financially and socially that he is at. You are a joke, thanks for the laugh."

XXXXX X XXXXXX<mailto:xxxxxxxxx@students.uwlax.edu>
Student
University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse

[My response to this guy was to ask, “May I quote you?” He wrote back far more briefly than his first email: “No!” Here is my response to him:

I’ll do it without your name.
You had a big mouth on Saturday. What’s the problem today?
John T. Reed

I will Google him. If he is a public person, shooting his mouth off all over the Net using his real name, I do not need his permission. I doubt he ever comes out from behind his handle. At one website, such people were required to identify themselves as “anonymous cowards.”

Well put. If you have a comment for him, please send it to me addressed to “U of WI student.” I will forward them to him.]

This guy responsded with the following which use a different name from the name at the bottom of the first email.

The problem is very simple!
Someone referred me to you site. I was hoping to find an intelligent mentor but to my surprise I discovered that you are an idiot. I am trying to become an educated person. My time is to precious to waste with an idiot. Please do us both a favor and do not send me any more e-mails. I've used my "Big Mouth" to say all that I need to say and I'm no longer interested in anything your BIG MOUTH have to say. Please grow-up soldier boy.
Don't quote me. Don't use my name. Take my name off your e-mail list. Don't sell, publish or give my e-mail address to anyone else. Thank you very much.

On 7/30/08 4:27 PM, "fern GULLY" <elchessboy@yahoo.com> wrote:

HEy ..ur an ASSHOLE. I bet you are just hating on Robert's book rich dad poor dad, because like every other white person, you don't want a non-white to be the BEST selling book out for years huh?

Grow up mr. john reed! Be like DONALD, copying robert's move on the secrets on becoming rich. No wonder they teamed up! Donald saw how great Robert was doing and he decided to write a book to. smh.. you people need to grow up!
[Note from John T. Reed: When I asked this email writer for permission to quote him or her, he or she said “Definetely”(sic) and told me that his name was a name I refuse to print because I think it’s a lie. I would appreciate it if someone who is knowledgeable about email would tell me his or her name and how you figured it out. I know how to track them down as well, but I’m too busy at present. A quick check reveals he or she is trying to sell a Dell computer on North Jersey craigslist: http://newjersey.craigslist.org/sys/766193796.html There’s also http://www.youtube.com/user/elchessboyRULEZ] Here is the header on elchessboy’s email to me:

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Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2008 16:27:24 -0700 (PDT)
From: fern GULLY <elchessboy@yahoo.com>
Reply-To: elchessboy@yahoo.com
Subject: RICH DAD....
To: "johnreed@johntreed.com" <johnreed@johntreed.com>
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Hello,
After reading your article on Kiyosaki http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html I am purely amazed at your ignorance. You said you read Rich Dad Poor Dad, but after hearing what you said there is no way that you read it, either that or you completly misunderstood it. You misinterpreted ALL of his messages. His books are more about the mindset you should have about finances, not directions on what to do. You said that he is not a businessman, just an author...well considering his company (which is far more than a book company) is growing at an unbelievable rate I would say he is doing something right in the world of business. Misinterpreting things is human, everyone does it, but to go off and rant about it on your website...get real. You made a fool of yourself and any credibility you might have had with people you ruined. Quit trying to bash others to make yourself seem better because you are jealous you will never get to the level financially and socially that he is at. You are a joke, thanks for the laugh.

Jordan P. Smith

Student
University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse


I do not know how to say it in english, the croatian phraze is HOLIZAM. That is what you lack in your mindset. I was reading your home page, and I thought I would see some interesting details about Kiyosaki but after few lines, I realised that a) You didnt read the book or, worse scenario b) you do not understand the book in whole.
You are, like most people, nothing but financial uneducated person. With 1000$ you would go to E bay and sell stuff? rofl
You think that there is 1 (!!!) person in this world that is broker AND rich?
Robert Kiyosaki SELLS his real estates?! Where DID u read that in his book?!
Rich gets richer and sometimes they get poorer?!?! rofl?!?! That person was NEVER rich, no matter how many money he/she accumulated.
The more money u make the more money u keep?! WTF?!?!!
HOW CAN U KEEP SOMETHING THAT DOES NOT EXISTS?! Yeah, money does NOT exists!
a) Money does not exists.
b) Money is power.

BOTH is true! But you can NOT understand that. Why is that? Because you have 0 (!!) real estates that is ASSET. And you are real estate guru?! Rofl. You are plain broker that will, when dies, leave nothing but debts to his children and family.
Kiyosaki IS retired, he decided to teach and THAT is why he sells books.
"Irrelevant. You should use mortgage and credit card financing whenever they will help you achieve your goals. Resenting bank profits is childish." rofl
"Yes, they do. This is sour grapes less successful people use to rationalize their inability to succeed. They lack the character to simply admit that they got beat fair and square in the economic aspects of the game of life."
You are NOT rich and u lack education.
I am VERY rich and I know that.
Well, at least I had a good laugh.
Take care
p.s.
Please, do NOT respond to this letter - I will NOT read it. 10x in advance.

Hi John,

I know you're a busy man, so I'll keep this brief. I was forwarded a link to your site from a friend who thought I would appreciate your clinical dissection of Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad Poor Dad. I read Rich Dad Poor Dad a number of years ago, while at university, and have to admit that the idea of escaping the rat race definitely appealed to me, as I'm sure it does toeveryone.

It didn't help that at the time I was studying engineering, and wasn't particularly enjoying it. What Rich Dad Poor Dad did for me is create a substantial feeling of status anxiety. It seemed to highlight I was some sort of failure because others less intelligent than I were “in the know” about these profitable investments; yet for all my intelligence and academic success, I was barely making ends meet.

I now work in financial planning, about to become an authorised representative for my company, so I think I am qualified to advise people that Kiyosaki's book is hogwash. It alarms me how easily people (including myself) were, and continue to be, fooled into thinking that there are get-rich-quick investments in this world. I'd like to believe that if people understood risk/reward and the time it takes with limited cash flow to grow assets, perhaps they wouldn't be so easily sucked in by the allure of “big-hatted” Texans spewing this drivel, but I'm probably wrong.

It doesn't take a genius to guess that Robert Kiyosaki and all of these other so-called gurus are really just con-men selling people the idea of untold wealth, but I guess at the end of the day, people want to believe that there is a possibility of [easy] escape from the clutches of the rat race; even if theidea of others achieving it makes them even more miserable. Complicated buggers, aren't we?

Robert Kiyosaki's heart may have been in the right place (his wallet certainly was) when he preached the importance of financial education in life, but his profiteering means of conveying that message is, quite honestly, unethical, conniving, and downright manipulative.

Financial education is essential, but you don't get it from reading this type of crap. I mean real education from finance professionals who can prove their track record, who are happy to put you in contact with current or former clients, and who have the relevant qualifications to give you the best advice or coaching. Just remember, anyone who is accredited to give financial advice, has to, by law, be completely transparent. Anyone who dismisses education and is from the so-called “school of hard knocks” can tell you whatever the hell they want, to your detriment. I'm no expert on US investment legislation, but I'm beginning to think Robert Kiyosaki made half of that crap up because he thinks we aretoo lazy to research this stuff—or, more accurately, his target market [persons] aren't in a position to do anything other than buy a $30 book, so have no reason to check his facts. It's people like you, John, that expose such frauds for what they are, andkeep the rest of us bastards honest.

Regards,

Chris Byrne

P.S. I think your site is fantastic. I consider myself to be something of an optimistic skeptic about almost everything, so I value your attitude towards life. Keep up the good work! Oh, and I love your choice of “selected responses” to [your] Kiyosaki article. My favorite would be the CEO of “We Mow Lawns Inc??” Classic!

Hello Mr. Reed,

I am tremendously excited to find your site and can't wait to read more. In fact I am sitting here again this morning, on a Saturday, just out of the shower, reading your Positive Cash Flow link. Thank you for gifting so much information and writing so clearly and efficiently. LOVE the vocabulary list.

I've been looking to learn more so I can become a better investor, or at least to relax and trust my instincts. Ten years ago,I bought the crack house next to me to evict the gun toting, mentally ill, crack selling tenant. I now have two rentals. I got good deals on my houses, great rates on fixed loans, put as much down as possible and paid them off as I could. Everyone tells me I'm not doing it right. I should "leverage" my assets. But being a self employed artist, not a financial professional (damn me for not taking accounting in college!), I have precious little time to figure out how to do that.

I got talked into reading RDPD and playing the cash flow game a few times. While I appreciate how well the game illustrates the function of a budget and the impact on said budget ofhaving a baby vs. not having a baby, or buying a big screen TV vs. not buying one, I was dumbfounded by how much money his game pretends you can make with real estate and stocks. Even after living through some of the largest gains in property values in history, I can't see how someone can be so profitable. He presents investing as having no risk, expense or time involved. Even more outrageous, he claims finding killer deals is EASY. Just jog through the neighborhood. Holy cow. Definitely not my experience.

So thanks again. It's a relief to find you. I'm going back to reading.

Colleen

Dear Mr. Reed,

I wanted to take a few moments to thank you for your refreshing views in the area of real estate investing, and your reviews of other "gurus" and real estate literature. In my years of education, and in life in general, for that matter, I have always found the best teachers/mentors to be those who offer encouragement when needed, and a kick in the pants when needed. Those who spout nothing but positive are doing a disservice to their followers (i.e. all the get-rich-quick gurus) and I appreciate your dedication to accuracy, which clearly lies above your dedication to sales.

I found your site after buying a copy of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad". I was about half way through and had to put it down due to the overhwhelimg stench of BS, so I googled the phrase "Rich Dad Poor Dad Scam" and your site came up as one of the more relevant ones. I can easily say that each and every word of your review rung true to me, and made me feel better about feeling uneasy while reading it. Never before had I seen so many words convey such little meaning!

I recently purchased my first investment property and am contemplating another, but won't do so until I can read your book in it's entirety (Residential Acquisition Propery Handbook). I have a feeling that much of what you recommend will seem tedious at first, which in my experience means its appropriately thorough and will result in a better chance at success than if I didn't have your guidance and expertise. As a wise man once told me, the devil is always in the details.

Thanks again,

Jason Milleisen

Thanks for your page. I would love to doubt what you said, but too much had a ring of truth to it. Some of the general advice was probably good for someone like me, but I can see how it hurts in the long run. I only wish I had seen your page first. I probably could have saved myself a lot of money.

Sincerely,
Tom Knighton

Dear Mr. Reed:

I've just spent a considerable amount of time reading the special section of your web site on Robert Kiyosaki. As a 1986 USMMA graduate, I was dismayed to learn that you weren't getting much support from the student/alumni community regarding the validation of Mr. Kiyosaki's claims about his military academy history and subsequent military service/real estate/business/writing career.

Although I never read Rich Dad, Poor Dad, I did buy and read The Rich Dad's Guide to Real Estate Investing (that might not be the exact title but I think you'll recognize which book it is). I really can't remember much about the book - it only took a couple of hours to get through - except the concept of having experts to look out for your interests (attorneys, tax advisors and the like). In fact, maybe Kiyosaki didn't even write the book - now I'm remembering something about a woman whose last name is Kennedy - one of Kiyosaki's experts.

Anyway, I also remember that I didn't subscribe to some of the techniques described to profit from real estate. Everyone is different in their property goals. Mine just happens to be a buy and hold style, so I wasn't particularly interested in the flipping strategies described in one or more of the chapters.

Back to the subject of the USMMA, I am happy to say that attending and graduating from Kings Point is the best thing I've ever done to enhance my chances of being successful in business and in life. The motto of the school is "Acta, Non Verba" or "Action, Not Words." Subsequently, I've earned an MBA and am directing both of my children to get a great education. I can't stand the fact that after graduating from Kings Point, Mr. Kiyosaki espouses the belief that a person doesn't need an education to be wealthy. That's an indirect hit to the Academy.

In any event, feel free to use my name. I'd also be curious to know the 1986 graduate's name that you quoted on your site ("A 1986 Merchant Marine Academy graduate tells me that about half of the students there were rejected by Annapolis or another major service academy. He said the other half wanted careers on oceangoing ships."). It seems to me that a lot of people don't know about the USMMA as a Federal military academy option, and I have no means of validating that classmate's statement. The fair majority of midshipman I remember were local to the NY-PA-NJ area and competed furiously for spots at USMMA.

My pride is probably getting in the way at this point because I hate to think of USMMA as a second or third choice after one of the other academies. The school has a different mission and a different chain of command (DOT vs. DOD in peace time) than USNA, USAFA and USMA.

I enjoyed your site and could go into my experiences with the Marshall Reddick Network and property managers but I wanted to stick to one subject per e-mail. Thanks for the education on Mr. Kiyosaki. I had no idea.

Gayle McCutchan (graduated from USMMA as Gayle Hatfield, Class of 1986)

Dear Mr. Reed:

I would like to request that if you post this anywhere, please do not use my name.

I was first given a copy of Rich Dad, Poor Dad by my father in law who had received it from his ex-girlfriend. Since this book was coming from a man that is quite comfortable in his finances, I took it seriously.

After reading the book, I quit a job where I was making a decent salary as an engineer and then proceeded to waste the next two years of my life. Since Kiyosaki says that it is so easy to run a business and make money, I figured that I would be rich in no time. Unfortunately, after losing more than $30K trying to start up my easy income, I've gotten nowhere. What I can't believe is how there are people out there that call this a good book. There is nothing good about it. It is propaganda for a mass majority that is desperately trying to cling to something. People that are trying to blame everybody else for their problems. People that want to understand why they have nothing, yet fail to see that the Mercedes Benz is not helping them at all. Kiyosaki is full of crap, he oversimplifies things and says absolutely nothing. Too bad I figured this out too late. My only salvation is that I'm still in my twenties and have plenty of time to make up for the money that I lost. Thankfully, I've recently found a job in my old line of work at about the same salary as before. This guy is dangerous; because of his stupid advice, I actually lost two years of income, lost an extra $30K, and almost got divorced.

Name withheld by request

“Greetings Mr. Reed, I found your website and read the analysis you have posted on Robert Kiyosaki. I had just recently got the book, read the first few chapters, and was a bit bothered by the 'homesiness' and silliness of the child-told stories that supposedly led this man to where he is today.

I have to tell you that I was prodded to buy this book by a very good friend who does nothing but rant and carry on about what a genius this guy is. What I found in reading the first 60 or 70 pages is that your assertions in the analysis are correct - the guy is either the luckiest man around with stellar timing, or things aren't quite what he claims.

But the main reason for writing is to tell you about a fool I know. This fool received an email telling about an hour long telephone conference call that anyone could attend for a $28 fee, and Robert Kiyosaki and David Novac (www.davidnovac.com) would be discussing upcoming stock market opportunities, what to avoid, the dangers of certain other investments over the next year, and a variety of other things that people would greatly benefit from.

That conference call was, I believe, this past Tuesday at 7pm mountain time. So the fool (me) paid the $28, received an email with the 800 number and passcode on it for the call, and rushed home. I fired up Word to take notes, put my headset phone on, and dialed in.

What followed was nothing more than a 'sales meeting' a la Amway style, where Kiyosaki and Novac shamelessly promoted their books and tapes on investing. Now, don't get me wrong. I agree with their assertion that there are far too many people who jump into the market without knowing what they're doing. And education is paramount to avoid just making your contribution to the people who know how to play the game, and then running away with your tail between your legs.

But what isn't right is to promote the call as being heavy on information that everyone can use to make informed decisions, and then sell them things. It's amazing ... I feel like I paid $28 to attend an Amway/Quixtar meeting. Essentially, I was lied to, as was every other person played for a chump who was on that call. He should be prosecuted for false advertising. But it was a lesson learned and I will never trust him again.

Just thought I'd pass it along. You have my permission to use my letter and name to warn others, and please email me if you have any questions or you would like a copy of my Word notes from the 'conference' call. Be Blessed, David Ruthstrom (rooth-strum), coloradocollectors@yahoo.com, Elizabeth, Colorado

“I just finished reading http://www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html. I have one word for you:
Bravo!”
Robert Brooks

“You deserve credit and thanks for debunking Mr. Kiyosaki. Unlike you, I did not read the entire Rich Dad Poor Dad book. But I have a son and was attracted to the concept of empowering my son with usable advice. It is this attraction, this vulnerability, more than anything else that makes me wish to extend thanks to you for countering Mr. Kiyosaki's exploitation. It is a really low blow to exploit a father's love for his children to sell garbage books.

In the public library I read maybe thirty pages, deliberately chosen, of Rich Dad Poor Dad, and was disappointed to learn that it was rather insubstantial, if not contradictory or confusing. I was hoping for something different, perhaps a distinctly concrete, fact based comparison of two social groups with revealing insights. Or perhaps a parable showing with evidence how common misconceptions about personal money management have social roots, or something.” Sean Arthur

“I belive in getting all sides of the story. While you had some very valid points in your article RK also has some in his books. I never quite finished your whole article but read much of it (it was very long). After sitting back and thinking about it this is what I have decided. You wasted a whole bunch of time attacking someone else when you could have been doing something constructive with that time. I also think you have some serious hate and jealousy issues. If you think their is nothing to be learned from RK's books I will have to consider you a fool. no offense.” respectfully yours, cody anger

“Thank you, thank you, thank you for all the effort you have invested in your Kiyosaki web page. I certainly agree that you put much more effort into researching your web page than Kiyosaki put into researching his book.

My son, like the surgeon's son, had decided that he could get rich by getting involved with a MLM scheme instead of pursuing his education. The MLM person even gave him a copy of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad."

My initial uninformed impression of Kiyosaki was positive, that the book was a lot like "The Millionaire Next Door." But when I went to Kiyosaki's web page, I was shocked by the anti-education message. The way he denigrates his well-educated true father is appalling. It is also a gross violation of the 4th Commandment. I told my son, "I'll take the Poor Dad any day. If I had to choose, I'd rather be poor, honest and well-educated. Much better that than an unethical rich schemer."

Then to find out from your website that "Rich Dad" is a fiction! The uneasiness I felt at Kiyosaki's web site was confirmed by your outstanding research. You analyzed, explained, investigated and demonstrated all the fraud behind Kiyosaki that I could only sense, but couldn't articulate properly to my son.

You have performed a wonderful service. And I hope that you have saved my son from making a disastrous decision that could have sidetracked his life for many years. He was so thoroughly brainwashed by this MLM "cult" that he was resistant to hearing the truth. But when I kept reading point after point from your web page, as you proved again and again that Kiyosaki is a fraud, I believe that it finally got through to him.

Then he fell back on, "Well who cares about Kiyosaki. The MLM scheme is still a good idea." But I replied, "Look, they are giving you anecdotal stories in place of real data. They will never tell you the average income of the MLM participants because it's probably negative after subtracting the entrance fee. So the hold up these "success stories" of individuals who became fabulously rich. But it turns out that these anecdotal stories are frauds. The whole concept is a fraud."

I especially appreciate the way you analyzed the psychopathic aspects of Kiyosaki. Worse than the wasted time and money is the transformation of character that occurs. These MLM schemes teach you to be a rotten person -- focused entirely on greed and instructed by "motivational" tapes to ignore the feelings and even the outright protests of your friends and family as you try to suck them into your "system."

You have performed a wonderful public service. Please accept my grateful congratulations on a job well done and my best wishes for your continued success.” Sincerely, John Galvin

What I have to conclude after reading key parts of [Kiyosaki’s] 1993 book [If You Want to be Rich & Happy, Don’t Go To School] is that it is just impossible to tell what is real and what is imagined in Kiyosaki’s autobiographical saga, now spread over several books. Is Kiyosaki a pathological liar, or delusional, or both, or is there some other explanation? I can’t say. I am convinced, however, that the ‘Rich Dad’ figure who is so prominently featured in Rich Dad Poor Dad [but totally absent from ‘best teachers I ever had’ discussions in the earlier …Don’t Go To School book] must be a complete figment of Kiyosaki’s imagination.” Geoffrey L. Bryan

“I Literally just tossed Dolf De Rooses "Real Estate Riches" in the dumpster. I plan to do the same with Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad Poor Dad" as soon as I can retrieve it from a (hopefully still) friend I loaned it to. Good Lord, it is amazing what ends up as "recommended reading." I am a 40 yr old working physicist and software developer who is admittedly ignorant about nearly everything except physics and software development! Hard work and some good fortune has dramatically increased my earnings of late and it is very clear to me that I must learn how to mange investments and taxes. A few hours
browsing your website (combined with my own so recently repressed commo sense) has shown me that these guys are not the answer! I read every page of "Rich Dad Poor Dad" in two evenings believing that I had found some kind of insight into investing that with just a little more information..... The fact that this book is presented as non-fiction, supposedly relating actual events and the wisdom of a proven successful investor lead me to assume a dangerous level of credibility. My biggest concern was that there was not enough details or math or real specific numerical examples for me to understand the concepts (though I thought perhaps some of the other books would make it clear). Your analysis of "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" made much more immediate sense to me than the book itself did. As must so many other people (based on the "bestseller" label) I desperately want to believe there are easy answers to investing, yet I know that nothing worthwhile ever comes easy. I truly thank you for your website and your critical review of Kiyosaki. I will be far more skeptical of such material in the future regardless of how many bestseller lists and other associated hype it has piled on it.” James Diederich

“I just finished reading your scathing article on Kiyosaki. I was not prepared for the information it contained, I'll give you that!

At the start of the article I was deeply offended because I had in a sense idolized Kiyosaki and made him a role model. Your foundation dynamiting article was more than enough to trigger an emotional response in me. But with the belief that more knowledge is almost always better, I decided to keep an open mind and hear you out.

I was most shocked at the copyright notice that some stuff had been 'fictionalized'. I pulled open one of my Kiyosaki books (I have all four) and sure enough found that little sentence in all of them. I could understand him taking some liberties to recreate his conversations with Rich Dad, but fictionalizing them all together? If all he did was take some liberties it might be better to just state that and that they were recreated, not fictionalized. But I digress.

After concluding your article, I must say that you have made me think seriously about what I have read in his books. I strongly agree he does not give how-to advice. In fact, I can't really think of any specific advice he gives other than to use your brain. And after reading his books I did not have any strong desire to finish college. I have already completed 2 years of college. Perhaps my lack of enthusiasm for college was brought about by Kiyosaki's disdain for the educational system.

The contradictions were easy to pass over while I had Kiyosaki enshrined, but when you put them down in writing in your tables, I had no choice but to mentally acknowledge them and follow them through to their logical consequences. The entire way through my brain kept trying to rationalize and defend him, something I found quite odd. I was defending HIM, not his ideas, because I like HIM.

That got me thinking about how successful he was as a salesman. I think he does have a killer personality that he conveys, and I have to humbly admit that I have been duped.

As noted earlier I am a college student, but just recently have gotten very interested in real estate investment, and actually was planning to purchase my first property this fall. Perhaps I should hold off? A lot of my enthusiasm for getting started originates from Robert Allen and Kiyosaki. I haven't yet read your take on Allen, but I did see that he had some financial troubles on your guru page.

Strangely enough, I came to your website through a recommended reading list on Kiyosaki's forums by another investor. I wonder if he just ordered your book and didn't bother to actually look at your site?

Thank you for all this overwhelming at present information that totally shatters my idol status of Kiyosaki. I think I will be a smarter investor with the knowledge you've equipped me with, and I don't think I can ever read another Kiyosaki book the same way.

Also, might it be possible to check for the existance of Rich Dad in various Hawaii news archives? I remember a specific passage in one of Kiyosaki's books that said no one knew who rich dad was until this 'quiet-spoken man' quietly began buying up large sections of waikiki and honolulu and was featured in all the papers.” Aksel Arnesen

“Hi John,
Yesterday, I was looking for the website for Robert Kiyosaki's 'free report' that comes with each of his books. I've purchased most of his books. Each book has a website link to a free audio report. I was at work & wanted to download the audio commentary using my fast internet connection there, but I didn't have the link, so I did a web search for richdad & ran across your website.

Ouch.!!!

Your discussion of Kiyosaki's work came up first. I read through the first couple paragraphs, and felt my blood start to boil. I was angry, "How dare he say that about someone like Kiyosaki." I'm smart enough to be able to smell the scent of truth when its shoved in my face though, so I kept reading. Ouch. The truth hurts sometimes. I had bought everything Kiyosaki said hook line & sinker. I'm even involved in a group that gets together every other Monday to play his Cashflow 101 game.

Thank you for writing what you wrote. Its saved me a lot of wasted time. I've bought several books on real estate investing. Its interesting. The ones that you don't recommend (Carleton Sheets (just his book - I wasn't stupid enough to buy his program), Kiyosaki, Dolf de Roos) left me feeling pumped up but lacking the knowledge I felt I would need to start investing. I have three others that I've purchased recently--each contains more useful information in one chapter than all of the Sheets, de Roos, & Kiyosaki books I've read combined.

After reading all the fake gurus' books, I had decided to include real estate investing in my 5-year plan. I'm 27, have a lot of credit card debt that needs to be paid off, spending patterns to change, a savings account to build, a bit of maturing to do & some reading to finish before I consider getting into real estate. Maybe at a gut level, I didn't trust what I had read. I don't trust people who don't talk about the pitfalls of something. If I don't have a good list of the ways I can fail at something, I don't get into it.

Thanks for opening my eyes. I will be doing more research as I get ready to start investing. I'm sure some of that research will include some of your books.” Regards, Jon Lehman

“HI,
MY NAME IS CHRISTINE THORNTON AND I WANT TO SAY THAT I LOVED THE BOOK. I'M A 22 YEAR OLD COLLEGE STUDENT THAT IS MAJORING IN BUSINESS, I FEEL THAT EVERYTHING ROBERT TALKED ABOUT IN HIS BOOK WAS ALL I NEEDED TO KNOW. WORKING FOR MONEY SUCKS WHEN IT CAN WORK FOR YOU. I OWN TWO DUPLEX APARTMENTS IN MILWAUKEE, WI AND I DON'T PAY RENT, AND I DON'T WORK FOR MONEY AND THAT IS WHAT YOU CALL LIVING. THAT HOW LIFE SHOULD BE FOR ALL 22 YEAR OLD COLLEGE STUDENTS.

I FEEL YOUR MAD BECAUSE HE'S LIVING ON MILLIONS$$$$$$$$$$$$ AND YOUR LIVING ON NADDA(NOTHING) SHIT ************ HA HA HA HA HA CHRISTINE THORNTON

“Mr. Reed,
I have read a couple of Kiyosaki's books and although I felt pumped, I also always had a feeling of uneasiness. Something just wasn't right. I kept imagining an old wise asian man ending his sentences by calling his student "grasshopper". (Now I think that character was the model for "rich dad" in Kiyosaki's mind.) And my wife and I had commented about the numerous contradictions we saw. After reading your review I find that I now understand why I felt that way. You put what was screwed up about his "teachings" in coherent, easy to understand form. You clarified my own befuddled thoughts.

You probably also saved me from doing something really stupid. I still shudder when I think how close I came to messing up my life as a result of Kiyosaki's brainwashing. Thankfully all I lost was a few bucks for a couple of his books.

I'm not giving up on real estate investing but I will be much more careful about the education I get pertaining to that subject. And I will definitely utilize your Real Estate BS Artist Detection Checklist in the future. Many thanks from my wife, my family and myself.” Ken Douglas

“Your article on Robert Kiyosaki was quite an insight. I had to laugh when you used your illistration regarding his reason for becoming a merchant marine. I have bought his "education program" along with the books "Rich Dad Poor Dad" and "Cash Flow Quadrant" Although I thought some of his opinions were insightful (what type of people are in each quadrant) It was no more helpful than his pitch on TV. His pitch was just enough information to make you wonder if he had a new answer. "There is nothing new under the sun" And I wish I would quit forgetting that.

My Broker has advised me to read "The Millionaire Next Door" That will be my next read after "The Worldly Philosophers"

Thanks again for a well written article. I look forward to checking out all of the links you provided in the article. I will be auctioning off the choose to be rich package on ebay probably.” Dan Estey, Longview Washington.

“I just read your comments on Rich Dad, Poor Dad and wanted to say thank you. I have read 4 of RK's books. But I did NOT take the time to stop and analyse like you did... shame on me.
I have been investing in real estate since 1984. I own 8 houses and 5 small apts bldgs. I live off of the rental income I receive. I have read just about every book your site mentioned. I would say your comments are very accurate. I wonder why I have not stumbled across your works before...Once again, thank you. I appreciate your time and effort. Sincerely, Avery T. Horton, Jr.

“just read your review of kiyosaki. thanks for the slap. you're quiteright. if not you, who? you are qualified, capable and appreciated. thanks for the ballast. i'm partial to independent thinkers, as kiyosaki seemed to be, and sometimes i don't have enough knowledge or sense to judge a guru's merits. and i don't buy a naysayer's criticism without substance. you provided the substance and are immediately sobering. thank you very much. i bought three of your books and plan to buy more as i finish them. thanks, craig.

“Your review of the Kiyosaki book and the thoughts on how to tell a fake guru from a real professional are just excellent. I fully agree with your opinion on Kiyosaki. It appears that the only real skill he was able to develop is selling himself. People like him capitalise on other people's ignorance, laziness and need for 'easy and fast' solutions. I am glad I bought his book in the Russian translated version which cost me only $1.30 instead of wasting more than $13 if I have bought it at Amazon. Yours truly, Andrey Shpak, Moscow, Russia

“Just a note to thank you for your clear, hard-hitting, and informative negative review of RDPD. My mother got it for me for Christmas, and I immediately hated it for all the reasons that most of the book's detractors hate it:
-It contained very little useful information... the useful ideas that were in the book could have fit on half a page.
-the writing was appallingly disorganized and vacuous, a meandering and self-contradictory lecture unsuitable for any self-respecting adult.
-it was a very mean-spirited book, denegrating all of those who simply wish to contribute to the world by working, paying their share of taxes to help administer our society, invest sensibly, and retire comfortably.
- the book glorified conspicuous consumption (Porsches, Rolexes, etc) to a degree that nauseated me.

However, I don't know much about real estate or investing, so I was unable to evaluate his stories regarding the ease of finding good real estate investments, etc. I thought Kiyosaki was just an amoral shark with an eye for a good investments. It appears from your well-written, specific, and factual (and thus believable) review that many of the things that he claims to have done are very unlikely or illegal. In other words, he is a fraud and a liar as well.

Thanks to your review, I have decided to exchange the book for something more worthwhile. The idea of enriching this scam artist any further by keeping this book on my shelf is intolerable to me.

Cheers,
Darren McHugh
Vancouver, Canada

Dear Mr. Reed,
I would like to thank you for the information that you present on your web site. It is truly a breath of fresh air in a media that has largely been taken over by unethical and criminal sharks such as your 'bad' gurus. I have read books by some of them such as Allen and Kiyosaki and can say that your take on them rings true. I have also read one of your books and the difference is stark. Thanks again, Ray Dotson, Cincinnati, OH

“Dear Mr. Reed:

I just finished reading Kiyosaki's "The Business School for People Who like Helping People" given to me by somebody who purchased it at an MLM convention. Even though you analyzed "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", my conclusions were very similar to yours in that I found every one of his opinionated statements patently false and misleading and not able to withstand some basic common sense scrutiny. However, I was particularly appalled at a part in the book where he quotes an SEC rule (he calls it requirement) that does not exist to prove his point by an asinine distortion of the actual SEC rule that he probably heard about somewhere and assumed it meant something completely different than what is actually provided for by law and that neither he, not his C.P.A. co-author bothered to actually check.

Direct quote from page 56 of that book:

"In America, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the SEC, requires that a person have an annual salary of at least $200,000 a year for an individual or $300,000 per annum for a couple, and over $1,000,000 in net worth. This is a minimum requirement to be considered an accredited investor and to qualify for the investments of the rich. Less than 4% of all Americans meet that requirement. This means that only a few people are allowed to invest in the most profitable investments in the world ... one more reason the rich get richer."

Even the most ignorant investment-wise person this statement would strike as false - the American government does not dictate what investments people are allowed to make, as long as they are legal - there is no minimum income or net worth requirement for any kind of investment.

What he is falsely referring to as the SEC requirement for minimum income and net worth to qualify for the investments of the rich (and which I'm sure you are familiar with, as is any person involved in or familiar with private equity investments would be) is probably his misrepresentation of the definition of "accredited investor" under Rule 501 of Regulation D of the Securities Exchange Act of 1933, which, among many other categories of securities purchasers who qualify as "accredited investors" lists a category of people with individual income (not salary!) of $200,000 or joint income of $300,000 or (not and!) net worth exceeding $1,000,000.
[Note by john T. Reed. You can read SEC discussion of this subject for yourself at http://www.sec.gov/rules/proposed/33-8041.htm and http://www.sec.gov/divisions/corpfin/forms/regd.htm]
But the most asinine suggestion that he makes is that it is actually an SEC requirement to qualify for the "investments of the rich". For anybody who would bother to read SEC Rules 501-506 under Regulation D (which can be found at www.bowne.com) it would become immediately obvious that the terms "accredited investor" only comes into play for any issuer of securities that sells its securities in reliance on exemption from registration under Regulation D, or in what is commonly known as private placement. In a nutshell, in order to avoid a very costly process of taking a company public, an issuer can be exempt from registration as long as certain requirements under Regulation D rules are met, among them not selling its securities to more than 35 "purchasers". "Accredited Investor" does not fall into the definition of a "purchaser", so an issuer could sell its securities to as many "accredited investors" as it desires, but only up to 35 of those who do not qualify as "accredited investors". In addition, "accredited investors" are not entitled to extensive disclosure documents that those who are not "accredited investors" are entitled to because it is assumed that they are savvy enough to make their investment decisions based on less financial disclosure than those who are not. In other words, definition of "accredited investor" serves to simply put in more safeguards in for those who do not qualify as "accredited investors" when buying unregistered securities, not to disallow them to invest. To suggest otherwise is completely false.

Keep up your good works with exposing Kiyosaki's as a fraud!” elaine-ross@mindspring.com

Lately, I've gotten very interested in real-estate. It all started with Robert Kiyosaki. (I can hear you groaning, but wait!) His books were kind of a kick in the pants for me, a call to change my perspective on life, time and money. I was thrilled to have such a hopeful vision of the future, for once in my life. It was refresing to finally find someone who could tell me how to become financially secure. I read chapter after chapter waiting for the grand revelation; the one piece of advice that would make that idea click in my head; the "AHA!" as it were.

It never came. 3 books later the "AHA!" still hadn't come. Frustrated, but with some idea what I wanted to do, I set out to find my own path to wealth, still inspired. I started looking into real-estate, the "get-rich-quick industry", or so I thought at the time. After several months of frustration I realized it wasn't quite as easy as it sounded and gave up.

Towards the end of this phase, I stumbled across your website. Immediately, I was upset by your critical tone. Your scathing review of Kiyosaki's books upset me terribly, but not being one to simply dismiss an opinion different from my owne, I decided to read the entire review with the idea that I would compose a nasty letter at the end outlining your obvious bias and blatant stupidity. By the end I found myself agreeing with about half of what you said, and not sure what I thought about the other. After a day or so of pondering, I realized that all the reasons I felt so frustrated after reading the "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" series were exactly the reasons you have for disliking the man's writing so much.

After giving up on *everything* to do with making money, (in a moment of intense disillusionment) and returning to my long string of 9 to 5 jobs (several of which have provided me with valuable experience) I recently have decided to explore investing in real-estate again. Now, a year later, while looking for good advice, I have again stumbled across your website, again inspired by a book. Ironically, that book is a part of Kiyosaki's new series 'Rich Dad's Advisors'.

This book, 'Real Estate Riches' was written by Dolf DeRoos. I consumed it in one day, this time with more of a critical eye, and slightly more experience into the finance end of things. (I spent a few months working for Fleet Mortgage, now WaMu, in their Wholesale office locking loans and later as a Jr. Underwriter) Again, I've been inspired. I've looked at the numbers myself, and what Mr. DeRoos has to say makes some sense. While he's a little short on specifics, he isn't spouting complete drivel. And after all, this book WAS written as part of the Kiyosaki cult series. Perhaps the books he's written on his own might be a bit more helpful.

I decided to re-enter the world of real-estate. This time, I actually found a property near where I live in Caldwell, Idaho. Newly remodeled, cheap, with several tenants already in place and making a respectable sum in rental income, and an owner who was interested in getting a newcomer started in investing with little to no hassle, it seemed like the perfect place to start getting my feet wet. I'm still sure it would havebeen, but with no cash to bring into the transaction, I was unable to make the deal. I was lucky enough to meet wonderful agent who worked with me, showed me a few of the ropes, and got me a couple of important contacts. She represented her seller well, but tried just as hard as I did to make my offer work, even though more than a dozen easier offers would have taken less of her time and energy. She introduced me to a property manager who she has had wonderful experiences with in her own rental properties, and who I plan to check out more thoroughly.

None of my experiences in this venture were what I was expecting; neither the positive nor the negative ones. I have seen the pleasant side of real-estate, working with people who are out there trying to make the business as comfortable as possible. I have seen the not-so pleasant side of real-estate, such as the mortgage broker who suggested that he could get me in with 0 down if I was "intending" to occupy the premises. (implying very strongly, though never coming out and saying, "You could rent it out anyway, and what the wholesaler doesn't know won't kill them.") This time, I am very interested in continuing on in the business.

It may comfort you to know that I will never again take another shred of advice from Mr. Kiyosaki, thanks in large part to you. Mr. DeRoos I am still evaluating, though I have found his advice to be helpful, if a bit non-specific in places. I am curious to know what you have heard of him. As one who knows more about real-estate than I, I would be interested to know if you believe his words are worth paying for. Seeing a review on one or two of his works would interest me greatly.

In the meantime, I wish to thank you for providing your evaluation of these various gurus. I am going into future ventures with more caution, and a bit more wisdom thanks to you. Thank you also for backing up all your statements with evidence of what you are talking about. (A practice I had ingrained into me during my grueling high-school writing classes, and which is sadly lacking in most writing in this day and age) That alone sets you apart from many others I have read or listened to. Please keep the criticism coming, though it does grate on my nerves.

-Nathan Allen Nelson
IT Programmer
Idaho State Police

dEAR sIR,,i just finished reading a great part of your site regarding the above...you spent a great deal of time in tearing apart the above subject...would you be so kind as to do the same with the TRUTH of Who YAHWEH is
vs. Jesus and talk in detail about how a whole race of people have disapeared...THE HEBREWS...and who are the JEWS in reality as the letter J is only 371 yrs old...
if you would devote as much time to the above..many lives who be much improved and ten thousand angels who dance on your grave and you'd live eternally...
i await your reply...
Sarah Claybore womenofvalor@webtv.net

Dear John Reed,

I believe you're an honest irracional man and I also believe you may have helped many people with your guru raking. But I believe you are being an idiot on Kiyosaki's book rich dad, poor dad. In your review and unless you are completely stupid you constantly misinterpret everything on purpose and take statements out of context. You also make lots of unproved allegations. Maybe you should consider yourself for the "not recommend" list of your guru ranking on the accounts of lying and misliding the public. Ask yourself what are you trying to prove with all that false information...
david duarte

“youre a dream stealer , quit giving your stupid opinions on things you know nothing about . millions of dollars of real estate is bought and sold all the time using methods you say dont work. you just want people to think youre some kind of expert youre not.” derring595@aol.com

[A former Amway distributor sent me the following regarding the phrase “dream-stealer:”
“The one E-mail response that you show on your site calling you a dream-stealer ( The one that has "your" and "you're" confused and misspelled several times ) is undoubtedly from an Amway ( or some other MLM ) minion.
"dream-stealer" is the term of choice for anyone trying to point out holes in the brainwashed logic taught by MLMs.”]

“I just wanted to let you know that I found your information very valuable. I too was feeling very "uneasy" after reading Kiyoski's Rich Dad, Poor Dad, even through it was highly recommended by a good friend. I decided to do an internet search to see what showed up. I looked through all the options and yours seemed to be the only one offering a contrairian (sp?) view of his book. I only wish I had found your site before and saved myself the three nights reading. I was so intrigued by your commentary that I ended up reading the whole thing, including your things to look for page.

Thank you for your time and effort, by the way, your reference to your mother and getting advice from her was great. I loved the free advice offered afterwards as well! It was better than anything I read in Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Thanks again for your guidance and counsel,” George Andrews

“I was mad as hell when I began reading your article about Robert T. Kiyosaki and his book Rich Dad, Poor Dad. I should have known right then and there that I had been duped. I finished reading the your article only minutes ago and despite my embarrassment I want to thank you for writing a poignant article that even an ass like my self can understand. It was very well written and thought out, I enjoy your take no prisoners style, that is refreshing. There are several things I can be thankful for: I read it before I did something stupid, I will learn from my foolishness, and I still would like to be wealthy.

After I wrote you I spent a couple of more hours on your website, and found it very informative. I can appreciate your hard work, research and common sense approach. I will keep that in mind in with my future endeavors. I bought three of Robert T. Kiyosaki's books and thought that each one might lead to more detail, but as you noted they were primarily boasting or giving very dangerous information. My gut as well as my attorney and accountant were telling me the same thing, "something is a miss in paradise". I look at my experience with Robert as a truly inexpensive lesson in letting pillow talk lead me rather than good hard facts. Thanks again” David Johnson

“dude, get a life. you waste so much energy on negative stuff. no one cares.” sean power

“Mr. Reed:

A co-worker recently recommended Rich Dad, Poor Dad as an interesting self-help tool. After reading about ten pages, I was convinced that this book was fiction. It seemed as though "Rich Dad" and "Poor Dad" knew an awful lot about each other's finances even though it didn't seem as if they had ever even met. So much about Robert Kiyosaki's storytelling seemed so phony. I think, at first, my co-worker thought I was being too cynical until he found your website and your views seemed to mirror what I said. We have had quite a few fascinating coversations over the last few days
debating the pros and cons of the book and your review. Kiyosaki spouts the basic good advice "don't get into consumer debt" or "if you're in a whole, stop digging" like he's saying something new. Anyone with an IQ bigger than their shoe size knows what they're getting into with consumer debt and they do it anyway.

As a 32-year old self-supporting divorced mother with a good income, some savings, and a small, but growing investment portfolio, I'm open to ideas about investing. However, there's no way I would ever consider trying any of the outlandish things Kiyosaki claims can work. I'd rather be middle class with a nice but affordable house, the bills paid on time, one nice vacation per year, and moderately safe investments. The people that ride on the same commuter train I do must have thought I was nuts when I would laugh out loud at some of the outrageous things Kiyosaki says in that goofy book. I can't believe anyone would blindly follow this guy's advice to put off paying debts until your creditors and the IRS are screaming at you....especially if you're claiming to have the resources to pay these bills on time.

One final note. I wholeheartedly agree with your thinking that a Rolex is primarily purchased for the "show off" factor and certainly isn't worth financing $4,000. However, being in a position to pay cash for mine - without negatively impacting my finances or doing something illegal - is well worth the pleasure I get from giving one extremely extravagant reward to myself. There are many things in life that can be categorized as unneccesary, but bring us joy nonetheless. While life is too short to always be frugal, one of the few logical pieces of advice that Kiyosaki gives is to wait for the luxuries until you can pay for them. Maybe if more people would give themselves rewards they save up and paid cash for, there would be more disposable income to invest instead of giving it to credit card companies.

In any case, thank you for trying to level the playing field by using logic rather than "razzle dazzle". I truly enjoyed reading your lengthy review debunking that crap Kiyosaki peddles.

Gloria Vitro
Bolingbrook, IL

“John,
I am so thankful that I stumbled across this page. I was suffering from insomnia and saw an infomercial by "Rich Dad Poor Dad" Robert Kiyosaki. He was selling a program for $129.00. Now my question is this, if he is so rich and has all of the accoutrements of the wealthy set, why on earth is he peddling an obnoxiously flawed information package.

I have also read the book "Rich Dad Poor Dad" and it left me questioning many statements he made. I even had a conversation with my CFP (Certified Financial Planner) and was telling him about the information in the book. Well he read it and said "If anyone follows the steps he has lined out would either be poor the rest of their life or in jail".

I just thought I would share my two cents worth and thank you again for this page. Thank you.
Tisha Ferron

“Mr. Reed,

I just spent this past week reading and re-reading Kiyosaki's Guide to Investing and Rich Kid, Smart Kid. I must admit he has me enthusiastic about becoming even more financially literate. I am a 22 year old stay-at-home mother of two, part-time daytrader (yes, profitably) and have been investing my husband's 401k and IRA via the O'Shaughnessy methods. To tell the truth, I never even considered real-estate investing or starting a business until now. I was curious to see what others thought of his books, and a Motley Fool message board linked me here. I almost didn't read your review, expecting a long-winded jeremiad against his admittedly weak prose and vague advice. I was wrong--you really impressed me with your review of the first book.

I think Kiyosaki has a better advisor now, because there didn't seem to be as many inconsistencies in the books I read as you describe for RDPD, nor too much bragging. I did notice that the copyright page of the books, aside from the standard investment-advice disclaimer, casually noted that the stories within were fictionalized for impact. That raised a bit of a red flag from the beginning, for me. My husband and I both complained about the inane repetition that did feel like a smarmy infomercial, and while interested in his "board game," really couldn't justify paying about $400 for the complete family set. His praise of "network marketing" also made me wince. And why on Earth is he so interested in Australia? Isn't there enough real estate in the U.S.?

There are many other factors that made me uneasy with his content, even though I appreciated the inspirational messages (that I usually hate), and I agree with most of your opinion. The fact alone that little can be discovered of Kiyosaki outside of his seminar and book sales is more than enough to make anyone cringe. I will not purchase any more of his products, thanks to you, though I will now check out some of your book recommendations.” Stefanie Paterson

“By the time I was half-way into Rich Dad Poor Dad, I had written it off as a series of platitudes accompanied by a gradual flow of contradictions. Oh well, I thought, at least I learned a few real estate investment tricks. Your review robbed me of even that consolation.

I'm finding scam artists' ubiquitous warnings concerning naysayers to be excellent indicators of schemes to avoid. George Bernard Shaw offered a good defense for those of us with a questioning bone in our body: "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

Incidentally, my purchase of RDPD was accompanied by another impulse buy, "The Millionaire Next Door". I agree with you that this is an excellent book, and perhaps I'll follow it up with some from your recommended gurus.” Sincerely, Tom Card, Emeryville, CA

“John,

I saw RTK on Oprah and was curious. A friend spoke his name almost a year later, and I had a renewed interest. While reading the book, another friend sang his praises. I was hooked.

I read the first and started the second. I was on fire. And then half way through, something told me to run a search, not sure what it was, and I found your site. I was immediately upset and discouraged. "Why whenever someone has something inspiring does a naysayer come out to denounce it?" I thought. Some of what RTK said tapped into a previous belief that I had about the way of the world, so it seemed to make sense. But your site brought to light some things that were bothering me.

Although RTK's book, RDPD, had me ready to take on the world, I knew that I still knew virtually nothing about real estate or investing. I was disturbed, but thought my answers could be cleared up in the next book. Looking at your site also helped me realize that with my real estate ignorance, he could have told me that realtors have a secret hand shake that gets you great deals on property, and I would have fallen for it. He also praised MLM, which I thought was shady.

So I will finish the 2nd book, cautiously, with a little less motivation. Basically, people want to feel good. That book did that for me, but I'd rather feel good because I've been educated, and not because my ears were tickled. Those people who will defend a lie, because "it got them thinking" are fools. I'll take the truth any day. That way I can make informed decisions that may one day lead to me being truly happy.

I'm not saying that RTK is a liar. I just realize now that I have a lot to learn about finance before I go hog wild jumping on someone's bandwagon.

Thanks John, for keeping my head on straight.

Dynero Lee
Marketing Communications Specialist
dlee@asizip.com
Ascent Solutions Inc.
937.847.2374

“If only I had read your critique of Robert Kiyosaki's book, Rich Dad Poor Dad, before I wasted my money on it and therefore helped to increase his coffers.

I only bought the book three days ago but it was his appearance on Oprah* that led me to buy it. I thought his book was going to be full of clear-cut advice on what steps can be taken for proper investing. I'm afraid I fell into that category of the uninformed being completely duped.

I, too, found that his book is unsettling for reasons that I "can't quite put my finger on". I can say that it gave me a sense of being overwhelmed. His writings infer that there are a great many ways to increase wealth but he writes in such a vague way that it's impossible to know where to begin.

Thank you for your web site. You are providing a much needed service that I am very appreciative of.

Angela Propes
High Ridge, MO
*I feel I should mention that I am not a regular viewer of her show for the very reasons you list on your
web site.

“Let me begin with some background about myself. I'm 30, married, have 2 kids, and I teach fifth grade in a small city in south western Virginia. I enjoy reading books on investing and finance. I drive my wife crazy with our personal finances and torturing her with my observations. Some of the books I've read that have had an impact on me are the Stanley "millionaire" books and the Motley Fool books (particularly the DRIP book) and their website.

I've seen a couple of Kiyosaki's books at bookstores and was almost tempted to buy one of them. Something always held me back. I don't think I my intuition saved me, I now believe it was just blind luck but I'll take it where I can get it. When I did find a copy of Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad's Guide to Investing" at my local library I decided to check it out. You can attribute that to some of the frugality lessons I took from Stanley's book. As I read Kiyosaki's book I found myself feeling more and more uncomfortable with what I was reading and feeling. I just couldn't put my finger on it. I couldn't tell if it was the contempt he seemed to have for his father's financial choices or the apparent lack of loyalty he seemed to have for his own father.
Maybe it was the implausibility of the numerous conversations he had with his Rich Dad. I kept getting the feeling I was getting a print version of a cheap TV infomercial. Halfway through the book I finally realized I needed to see if I could find any information on Kiyosaki on the net. I realized I'd been misled by the legitimacy that being a "best seller" bestows upon an author. I mean, if your book is a best seller and can be found at Walden Books then you must be "right"?

An Internet search led me to your site. Let me say THANK YOU! You've saved me the hours it would have required me to finish Kiyosaki's book. One of the few positive things that Kiyosaki prattled on about was the value of time. Although he never quite gave you specifics or hard data on how to make use of time. That was one of the reasons I kept reading despite my misgivings. I kept waiting for Kiyosaki to lay out some kind of plan, some hard data to back up his arguments. I now find it strange that someone could go on and on about their success without actually providing dates, times, places, and names to strengthen their arguments.

Again, thank you for your web site. It's a great benefit to anyone whose made the mistake of reading one of Kiyosaki's book. At least I only wasted time, I feel for those who actually paid hard cash to read one of his books. E. Morejon”

“I don't know if you remember me. I wrote you a few months back and RAILED against you for denouncing Robert Kiyosaki. To be honest his response to you was disappointing to say the least. Unlike you, Mr. Kiyosaki has YET to give details about the money he's made as well as the Real Estate deals he's done. However, as my mom (who's a wonderful woman from South Carolina) always told me, "Son, when someone is telling you something, you eat the meat and spit out the bones." If I can learn from Robert, then I'll take what I can get and discard the rest. However, that's neither here nor there. What I wanted to commend you on is the candid information you give here. I don't agree with everything, but I got to say I'm with you on 85% of your views.

After reading your site objectively I can honestly say you are doing a great service to the Real Estate Investing Community. Especially for beginners. Too often we novices are taken in by the sway of the so-called "gurus". I never trusted infomercials so at least I didn't fall into THAT trap. However as I was looking at these "Real Estate Guru" courses, I kept wondering why they were so damn expensive. I'm not even going to COMMENT on Ron Legrand's Cashflow System. 3 of these courses (not to mention Ron's "HOTLINE" Team), for $1200. Has anyone stopped to think... If the "hotline" personnel are experts, why would they waste their time to sit around all day and talk to YOU? They could be out making deals. How can they give me FEEDBACK if they're not out there with me going through what I'm going through? All they can "give" me is "armchair" philosophy.

Also your guru analysis is excellent and I REALLY love your B.S. Artist Detection List. For the most part it's right on the money. It's always amazing that when you ask a charlatan to PROVE their claims they always have an excuse as to why they can't produce proof. Once you start digging, it all starts to fall apart. YOU can give the names and addresses of the deals you've done, WHY CAN'T THE GURUS?!?!?! I suspect because not ONE of them has even done a real deal.

I got most of my good information from a Real Estate Investor in my area who actually has a LEGITIMATE wholesale resale system, and reading The Unofficial Guide to Real Estate Investing. (I did read Shemin's Secrets of a Millionaire Real Estate Investor as well. It was an okay book, but as you said he did offered some questionable advice. I did appreciate the fact that the outlined both the PROS and CONS to certain methods.) I was in the process of doing a deal and I found out FIRST HAND that the whole NO-MONEY-DOWN scenerio as told by the "gurus" doesn't fly in the real world. Even with seller financing I STILL had to come out of my pocket of at least 5% plus I had to have at least 6 months worth of reserves in the bank before they would even CONSIDER it. Not to mention my credit wasn't that great. After I DID find a lender, the interest rate was at 12% on a SFR. My profits........$17 and change. Much bleaker than the rosy picture as told by the "gurus" isn't it? I decided it wasn't worth it and to work on strengthening my credit position and saving my money.

When I asked the Real Estate Investor who's mentoring me about lease/options and all that other "creative financing" stuff, he laughed at me. He purchases properties for pennies on the dollar, rehabs them, RENTS them, then sells the rented property to other investors at FMV after rehab. However, He has a line of credit and a large portfolio of projects. This didn't happen over night but he has shared his experience with me of what he's learned over time. He does do this full time.

How much has it cost me to learn from a REAL professional who's doing deals? $0. Whats his reward? He gets another person on his buyers list (I'm not stupid :-). How much did it cost me to learn about the nuances to Real Estate Investing such as property analysis, profitablity equations, how to do due dilligence, pitfalls to watch out for? - $15.29 (The Unofficial Guide to Real Estate Investing).

I also want to be a Note Broker, so I've spent about $300 on relatively inexpensive books (I actually have 7 of them), a subscription to noteworthy, and 2 courses (both by Jon Richards - who I’m GLAD you recommend). THATS STILL cheaper than ONE real estate investing boot camp by gurus.

I also have books on Tax Law, accounting, and Stock Market Analysis, both Fundamental and Technical (I feel you can't use one technique without the other). Even if you add all of the books I purchased over a 7 month period it's still cheaper than a "boot camp".

To sum it up Mr. Reed I'm glad there is someone out there willing to ask the tough questions, and force the gurus to prove their claims..legitimately. Keep up the good work and do NOT hesitate to post this on your website if you see fit. One day I'll be an experienced investor who might be able to learn from your experiences as well. I bet there will be more meat than bones :-)

Thank You, Melvin Jamal Green Virginia

“Thank you, thank you!!! I have just read Kiyosaki's three books and enjoyed them - after all, they are extremely easy reading. However, I kept having the feeling that something wasn't quite right but I couldn't put my finger on it. We were already beginning in the real estate market and were looking for guidance. His books hinted vaguely at what success is and that it is extremely easy for anybody interested, but then offered no specific help.

The corporation thing really bothered me and I was beginning to wonder if my CPA was guiding me correctly when his versions of what corporations could do differed with these best-selling books. That's when I started my own research and I happened upon your page. Your page is extremely clear, concise, well-written and easy to understand, plus it has the facts to support the conclusions—something Kiyosaki's books don't have.

So again I say, "Thanks" for confirming my intuitions when I didn't have the fundamental knowledge to back them up!”
Sharon Sanders

“I have had such fun reading your comments, which seem more like a hobby for you than a review at this point, that I wanted to thank you for your efforts. I have not read his book but have been intrigued by the title and the differences it implies about people with different upbringings. Just this evening my 19 year old daughter was asking me several questions about 401k's, IRA's, the compounding of money, etc., and she wanted to know how I knew all this stuff and where people learn it if their father doesn't tell them. I wanted to follow up that conversation so I went to the "Retire Early" site where he did a brief review of it, and he led me to your site. I am a 56 year old lawyer--I have been in the Air Force, worked in government and for a major corporation, and am now in private practice-- and I appreciated the wisdom and experience and respect for learning that you have acquired and are able to bring to bear in this review--all with charming candor, zero pomposity and a fine edge of irritation. It's plenty of good advice and a good read as well. Thanks. My compliments to you.” Russell D’Italia

“I read Robert Kiyosaki's book hoping to gain insight into financial success. Fifty pages into the book, I was in disbelief. He does a great job in coming up with little sayings that sound good but actually contain no substance. And the worst part is that he repeats them, over and over again. I went onto amazon.com hoping to see other reviews and expositions of this crummy writing. Of 535 reviews, the average rating of the book is 4/5 stars! But then again, I guess the general public isn't intelligent enough to discern fact from bullshit. I salute you for your excellent and well writen analysis of the book. Again, I have faith in humanity and the education I received in school. I found your review to be 100 times more interesting than actually trying to absorb his unfounded preachings. Thanks again, William Barret

“Thanks for the on-line evaluation of Robert Kiyosaki. As a small time real-estate investor with several rental properties, I purchased this book with high expectations of expanding my admittedly limited knowledge base. Not only was I disappointed by the poor writing and useless information that was presented in this top-selling publication, but as a Japanese-American and active duty military officer, became incensed and a bit ashamed to be related to Mr. Kiyosaki, however slight, via heredity and profession.
It's a shame that Mr. Kiyosaki and others have been able to dupe the public through self-aggrandizing proclamations and hype. Perhaps it's also a testament to the fragile nature of the human psyche which gravitates toward such publicity in the first place. Nevertheless, you're doing a tremendous public service through your on-line reviews and frequent updates, and I wanted to thank you for your meticulous analysis and diligence. Keep up the great work.
Sincerely, Clem Tanaka CDR, USN [Note: Tanaka is a graduate of UC Berkeley and the Naval Post Graduate School.]

[John T. Reed’s repsonse to Tanaka:] Thanks, One question for you as a Japanese-American. I did not find anything in Kiyosaki's book that I thought related to his ancestry, except that I did wonder about what I characterized as his fascination with indirect reverse psychology ways of teaching and learning. It seemed reminiscent of the Karate Kid movie. Is there anything in Japanese culture that would account for such a fascination? Another possible thing that comes to mind is that Asians are known for encouraging their children to work hard on academics. Is that possibly a factor in his hatred of traditional schooling and apparent rejection of the main theme of his father's life? John T. Reed

Mr. Reed, According to Robert Kiyosaki's web-site, www.richdad.com, he's a fourth-generation Japanese American (the same as myself). As for his philosophy of teaching/learning, Mr. Kiyosaki appears to be trying to interweave Confucian methods with those of his "past teachings." Although I can't say that I'm a scholar in Confucius philosophy, the basic tenet revolves around using metaphors to drive home points, vice direct statements. These have been portrayed in various western media such as in the television series "Kung Fu" and the "Karate Kid" movies which you mention.. He also made moral statements without actually preaching. For example, with respect to human relations and the results of one taking advantage of another, Confucius says: "If one's acts are motivated by profit, he will have many enemies." Confucius does not say "Do this" or "Don't do this," but rather elucidates the consequences of various actions, negative and especially positive. Many of the Asian cultures have been heavily influenced by this Confucian thought process, but sadly, this influence appears to be waning among the current generation of youngsters... much to the chagrin of their parents. Getting back to how this relates to Kiyosaki, my personal cut is that he's twisted the "ancient methods" to his own gain, and uses them as a way to subliminally bait the average American with the "power" of these teachings. The Asian culture does indeed emphasize academics, however it appears that Kiyosaki became more enamored by the success of his "rich father" and the apparent ease by which it was attained which lead to his rejection of the traditional path to success (involving hard work and long hours) and eventually to the spurning of his own father. Apologize for the long-winded response. Hope this helps. Clem Tanaka

“I just wanted to show you my appreciation for your website.

I just bought his 3rd book, and was highly intrigued by tons of financial information that I was never aware of. So I carefully read tons of raving reviews of his books on Amazon.com (and conveniently downplaying the negative ones), and decided to buy his first book, just so that I can read them in sequence.

While I was reading the 1st chapter of the first book, I came across your website and read your analysis of his book. I scanned it rather quickly, and mentally filed away your objections, because I was more into reading the book for making money.

When I finished reading the book, I felt like I was hit with bat to my guts because my way of thinking was perfectly aligned with "Poor Dad"'s thinking.

In order to calm myself, I re-read your review much more carefully, and felt as if I was hit in my stomach once again, this time for falling for such a hyped and low-quality book! How could I have parked my brain outside so guilelessly? This was so hard to take because I take pride on being able to discriminate good books from bad ones.

Anyway, I am returning the two books so you have saved me $50 CDN (I live in Canada), but more importantly you have saved me from countless hours of futility and despair. I am buying books on finance, accounting and taxes so that I can no longer fall for these scams.

[You may quote me] for I also felt inspired by the quote of that MBA finance guy who described my feelings perfectly. (Also felt good that if somebody who have had the actual knowledge of finance and accounting could fall for it, me a web developer with no finance knowledge could fall for it as well, if not more easily!)
Thank you!” Byungwook Bob Yu

“I took the time to read your rather long and thorough examination of K's book. Wonderful! Afterward, I did some internet searching on a book you mentioned, "The Millionaire Next Door," and for some reason decided to play with the search criteria. The result was a link to K's 'rebuttal' to your review. (http://www.mastermindforum.com/kiyosakiresponsetoreed.htm)

I must admit that I haven't finished reading it yet; but the first paragraphs are already triggering those inner warning lights. My first impression is that he's trying to make his 'simple' book appear to be a mild, innocent target of abuse by the bad Rich Man (referring to your psychoanalysis of K). In fact, 'simple' (and its variants) seems to be his favorite word. I almost get the impression that he defends his book as being entertainment, and as such, immune to close scrutiny.

[Thought it best to finish reading his letter. Wasn't that long.]

After reading his letter, I can't help be feel indifferent to him. He certainly hasn't convinced me I should buy his book despite your review.

I live in Norway, and therefore, regretably, don't have much use for your books on real estate (or coaching sports, for that matter.) I do, however, want to thank you for saving me from wasting my money on K's simple and entertaining book.”

Thankfully yours,
Roger Alterskjær
Trondheim, Norway

Subject:
The Point of Rich Dad Poor Dad, since you obviously MISSED it.
Date:
Tue, 13 Mar 2001 13:53:10 -0500
From:
"M. Jamal Green" <jamal@jmlcentertainment.com>
Organization:
JMLC Entertainment, Inc.
To:
johnreed@johntreed.comMr. Reed,

I found your so-called critique of Rich Dad Poor Dad to be the rantings and ravings of a man who's extremely jealous of Robert's success. Especially since you hold the view that Robert Kiyosaki can't be a TRUE real estate investor, knows absolutely nothing about finance, and (God forbid) didn't make it into West Point. It must drive you nuts that such an ignorant man is making as much or more money than you teaching things he doesn't know about. His book RDPD, which is full of inconsistencies and misinformation (according to you and a few others) has netted Robert and his company MILLIONS. How can you STAND IT?!?!?!

Robert Kiyosaki has admitted that he continues to try and work on his public speaking skills, is not the best writer in the world (but he's a best selling author...not writer..BIG difference), and when it comes to finance he knows enough to pick the best advisors. He never said he was the best student, or the smartest guy on the block which is why he recommends to EVERYONE to acquire the best advice you can. (Incidently, one of his advisors, Diane Kennedy, is a well respected CPA, only has clients with a yearly income of $500,000 or more, and is one of the authors of the Best Selling (there's that phrase again) book Inc. and Grow Rich)

Now on to the point of Rich Dad Poor Dad. The whole point of the book is to explain to ordinary folks who are trapped in the rat race, how they got there, and the mental changes they need to make to get out. Period. The book outlines the philosophy the rich have vs. the poor and middle class. YOU are an example of the philosophy Robert teaches. You are a
Real Estate investor whose properties bring in Passive income. I'm sure that the money you've made from your assets purchased your private jet, financed your son's Ivy league education, and pays for any expenses or liabilities you've incurred over the years.

Your main beef though seems to be with Roberts Real Estate Investing Methods. While I'm just learning the REI business, the very REASON I'm even educating myself about it is because of Rich Dad Poor Dad. my financial IQ has increased 10-fold, and I have Robert to thank for that..Even if the deals he outlined in his book are BS the very fact that I can do similar deals and make a killing inspired me to learn about Creative Real Estate Investing which is just what Robert wants his readers to do.

Finally, since you LOVE to quote from the book, let me give you a quote that you obviously missed in reading it. I suppose you were to blinded by your own arrogance and prejudice toward Robert Kiyosaki to see that this one sentence sums up the whole purpose of RDPD...

Page 19 "...The lessons are not meant to be answers, but guideposts."
M. Jamal Green darxkydehu@hotmail.com

“John,
You have a way with words. I liked your comprehensive analysis of "Rich Dad Poor Dad" but I must say that I also enjoyed the book. Many of your points underline areas where I would stop and choke as I read. Having said that, I think the author, like the skillful politician, captured the essence of a fresh paradigm. I did not view his book as investment advice at all, but as a sort of big picture reevaluation of my financial goals and "what assets" I was focusing upon. Like your comment about ink blot psychology, I think his charismatic, "you can do it" big picture evoked different things in different people. For me, it made me mentally divide my resources up once again into those that create assets and those that create liabilities. Anyway, I think your overall analysis was great and very useful for all of us who may have looked to "RK" as a sort of financial guru. Thanks again.” Mike Oakes

“I just wanted to thank you for writing your comprehensive review. I came across it after reading half-a-dozen typically, shallow, complimentary reviews about Rich Dad, Poor Dad.” Frank Boyaner, Ottawa, Canada

“I want to give you my impression of Kiyosaki's book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Let me start off by saying that I was very curious about this particular book based on the amount of press it has gotten, and the amount of controversy that has resulted from very divergent schools of thought about the book's content. First of all, I wish to say that all of the rhetoric involved with the term "poor" upsets me. I was raised in a middle class family, and in fact, two generations ago, my family could have been considered "poor". Every single individual in my family has sacrificed a great deal to further each subsequent generation, and the way this author lumps the "middle class" with the "poor", and calls them ALL "poor" really upsets me. I, myself, am a college graduate in the engineering discipline. I am also a self-taught student in the areas of finance, to which the author refers.

I read your review, and I can't do anything but agree with all of the critisims you have given this book. The author's CONSTANT and INCESSANT use of phraseology that seems to build up his conspicuous opulence really bugs me to no end. I, myself, will someday be a millionaire, and I can assure you that there is no way on earth I could afford spending $70,000 on a Porsche... Not a chance! And then there is the glaring BS - the fact that he makes sure to point out in his book that he likes to keep his income small and his bills low. What, with that Porsche, Mercedes, and Armani suits he keeps talking about?

John, like you, I went to both public and Catholic schools growing up. I can understand his disgust with the school system's lack of financial education. However, my mother is a teacher, and we have discussed this topic at length. We both concur that IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF SCHOOL TO MAKE REASONABLY LITERATE PEOPLE... PEOPLE WHO CAN BALANCE THEIR CHECKBOOK AND, HOPEFULLY, AVOID BANKRUPTCY. IT IS NOT THE DOMAIN OR THE RESPONSIBILITY OF SCHOOLS TO TRAIN MILLIONAIRES! So, I can see how it might be disturbing that schools do not teach this information, but I feel that this is yet another example of "passing the buck"... expecting schools to pick up the slack where the parents can't or don't fulfill their first and foremost responsibility to their children for education. That really irks me deeply.” Sean Clark

“Dear John,
How fantastic that you are taking the time to publish financial information on the internet.
I have recently read Rich Dad Poor Dad, which I'll admit I found very exciting and inspirational - as a recent graduate I have never thought about money as in way but a hassle - the "don't have any" kind of hassle. Here is a book which encouraged me to think about my money in new way.

Luckily, MY dad ( a POOR DAD by the book standards) has always encouraged me to make up my own mind about things by doing the research for myself.

I started by trying to look for criticisms of the RDPD method, and reading your critique has definitely been thought-provoking and helpful. I will be approaching any investments I make with much more care and preparation”.

Carry on the good work!
Regards,
Kristi Jarvis, New Zealand

“I ca tell you and Robert are on the same boat. Investments & Football. Please explain why you're website is soooo cheesy?! shit, Buy FrontPage2000 and do something a bit more fashionable. Have you even seen Robert's site?! Hehehehe... he even has Flash4.0 on it. That is a beautiful thing!

“‘I am a one-man company. I cannot do everything. Shipping outside the U.S. is a prime candidate for being one of the things I rule out’.

“Think globally! If and only if you would like to be a multi-millionaire, if not, then you should continue to haul buckets. That's tough man, I know what that's like and I've moved on from that realm of the One Man Show. You should consider reading Kiyosaki's other books on insight. Hey, did you know that Robert was on Oprah Winfrey?!! No, then you should take time to find out if that information is true or not. You know, him being on Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah Figures..., On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, 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On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, 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On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, 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On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah Figures..., On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, 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On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah Figures..., On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On 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Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On Oprah, On
“That's Oprah Winfrey, you know. Oprah, the TV chick.
“The more I read your article, the more I realize that you are just stuck in a bitter jealousy battle with yourself. STOP IT! Stop trying to bash other people. If you don'tlike what he has to say, then don't read it. Its that simple! You're going to drive yourself to a heart attack with all the hateful resentment you have in you. You need to follow the Zen Buddists and just relax. Holy Moses!

-Louis R. Torres
Series 7, 63, 24, & 8 licensure in the Securities Industry. And... making money in my two businesses. Thanks to Robert Kiyosaki. He changes lives. He wants to help... you actually seem like you my Rich Dad. I'm glad, it means that I'm not the only one that's as crazy as Robert. Heheheh... take risk silly!

“You may quote me as many times as you'd like, Mr. John Reed. FYI... I'm a much happier person knowing that I have a chance to become a millionare providing that I take on educated risks. Now, you my friend, on the flipside... are a sad individual. Investments as well as football?! I just don't get it. I guess, its not to be gotten by anyone else but you. I guess no one ever mentioned when you were a kid that if you don't have anything nice to say about someone, don't say anything at all. You're actually the first person I've ever known that absolutely dislikes Robert. Most people I buyt he book for are enlightened by them. You on the other hand are ‘Hauling buckets’. Ciao!” Louis R. Torres

“I've never heard of you, but I did find your comments on this novel to be dead on. My dad bought me "Rich Dad, Poor Dad", probably after his wife saw something on Oprah, or got a recommendation from a friend. I'm only 23, but I majored in Economics and have invested on my own for 3 years, and I found the book really lame. I tried as hard as I could to get something out of the book because my dad gave it to me and I wanted to impress him. After reading it, though, I just had this real uneasy feeling. I wasn't able to place it until I read your analysis - he does, as you say, seem like "he was scarred deeply by that humiliation" of growing up poor. Anyway, good job - I enjoyed reading your web site.” Regards, Kevin Brock, San Jose

“Very good - Thank you I am astounded at the depth and completeness of your writing.” Respectfully, Jon Cole, home builder

“I didn’t take the time to read your rather lengthly critique of Robert Kiyosaki's books. I only have a few things to point out (none of which require reading your online novel).
“1. I have heard of Robert Kiyosaki (who claims to be a best selling author- not a best writing offer) and I have purchased his books. I have never, and would never have heard of you if I had not.
“2. I noticed that at the end of your list of alleged errors and contradictions, that you segweyed rather nicely into selling your own books.

I'm open to new ideas, but not from the likes of you. Your time would have been better spent making a more positive pitch. Was it really necessary to tear down RK when you could simply have said ‘If you like RD/PD, you might find my material helpful.’ Instead, you took the rather ominous path of negativity- much of which is stating what Robert himself had admitted (like his writing ability, the fact that he was indeed a poor student, etc...). I don’t fault you for making an attempt to sell your own little known book(s), seminars, etc..., but I do fault you for using a much more successful person as your launch-pad. Nice (failed) try.” Sincerely, Paul S. Strauss, CEO We Mow Lawns, Inc.

“Just got through reading your review of the subject book and had to write to tell you that you performed a real public service in taking this pop investment book apart. I read the book a while back and while I found it mildly amusing there was absolutely nothing in it of any real value to real investors. Your dissection of the reasons for this was both incisive and entertaining. …I found your Aggressive Tax Avoidance... book of great value and still consult it some 5-8 years since I first came upon it. Also You need to know that it is totally out of character for me to write such a fawning note to an author, but please put me down as an admirer of someone like you who can cut through the crap and tell it like it is. Thanks again.” Irv Halland/ Saratoga CA

“I am 22 years old professional, I own my own home and I am looking to invest in rental properties as a means to financially support the less lucrative career I desire to have. I just wanted to say THANK YOU for your guru critique page. I saw the episode of the Oprah show with guest Robert Kiyosaki (Rich Dad, Poor Dad). I decided to see what this guy was all about and bought the book Rich Dad, Poor Dad. After reading it I had so many unanswered questions. I didn’t understand how to begin to do the things he suggested and why he would give away such valuable “secretive” information to the entire world. I caught a few of the inconsistencies you pointed out in your analysis and couldn’t decide if my hunch was right, or if I just wasn't investor savvy enough to apply these “amazing” secrets. Although I don’t 100% agree with your analysis, (I did at least find the book to be motivational and give me the “I can do this” push I needed to further research more proven methods and other resources) it did provide some valuable insight to the many scam artists out there looking for beginner investors just like me. Thanks again, your website is a great resource.”
Regards, Stacy D. Scholz

“Thanks for the nice hard wet slap across the face. I definitely needed it. I can't explain what happened other than I let my guard down. Knowing that I like to read on various business subjects, my wife recommended that I get Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad, Poor Dad." She had heard wonderful reviews about the book. It was an impulse purchase which, should have been my first indication of what was to come.

I breezed through the book and became motivated. Here was a great statement about the lack of financial education in our school system. Here was an interesting little story about a father figure helping to educate a boy about money. I admit it. I got sucked in and realized it after I read your review of the book. I thought to myself, "How could I let this happen? I have an MBA with a concentration in Finance, how could I just blow through the most basic concept of the time-value of money or some of the other inaccuracies?" In retrospect, several reasons come to mind as to why I fell for it.
The first is that I was reading the book for entertainment not content. Another, the statement of the lack of financial preparedness in our education system struck a cord with me. I looked for reasons in the book to support that statement. "Yeah, down with the man!" There are several other reasons that would be too long to list. The end result is that I fell for the hype and frankly feel very foolish and embarrassed. Thanks your verbal Aqua-Velva I realized the clarity of my mistake.” Regards, Chad Schneider, San Francisco, California

“Hi, my son (14 yrs) thought I should read Kiyosaki book RICH DAD, POOR DAD. I did.....and I am found him to sound like a AMWAY sales person. The give away was the cowboy boots, he was wearing!! Every person that I have come across who wears cowboy boots.....are not who they are. There was only one truth in the book...‘learn how to write a best seller.’” M. Nicholson

“I agreed with what you have written. I am a fan of Robert Kiyosaki. I have all his tapes, books, his autograph and even a picture of him. But NEVER in any page of his books, did he at least give 1 single plan for wealth creation. Not even a single formula. He once said in his tapes that he "does not want to insult the readers' intelligence by telling them the steps." But what about [beginners]? They have no intelligence in the field of wealth creation. What intelligence is there to insult in the 1st place?” Tan Soon Chye

“I just wanted you to know I thoroughly enjoyed your in-depth review of Robert Kiyosaki and his book "Rich Dad Poor Dad." I've always thought of him as somewhat of a quack so far as financial advice is involved, and found what he preaches to be a bit on the shady side. It's hard to believe that the wealthy accumulate money by taking questionable business deductions, or using insider information to play the stock market. His message has a dark tone, implying that in order to get ahead one must abuse the system or take advantage of others. I fail to understand how his book got a 4.5 average rating out of 5 stars at Amazon.com, from over 300 reviews. Either I'm not getting it, or there are a lot of clueless & illogical thinking people out there.” kchang@usa.net


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